Tutorials

DAY 1 TUTORIAL

AVIONICS AND SPACE SYSTEMS

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
This tutorial explores architectures from numerous civil and military aircraft. Key architecture and design challenges are described for legacy as well as the newest aircraft types. Architectures are examined with comparisons of hardware and avionics functions of each are discussed in detail. Civil aircraft investigated include Boeing 787 and Airbus A350. Military aircraft include F-22 and Rafael. IMA 2G and other advanced concepts will be explored. Specific architecture examples are used to represent real word design challenges and solutions. Integrated and connected aircraft concepts are explored in reference to the integrated modular avionics architectures and how they can support integrated digital datalink and future air traffic management. Architectures have been carefully chosen to cover the following:

  • Broad spectrum of aircraft types, military and civilian
  • Federated and integrated designs with emphasis on the latest modern commercial and military aircraft
  • Emphasis on the latest integrated architectures with partitioning and connected aircraft
  • Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) vis-à-vis modular packaging
  • Impact of the Modular Open Systems Approach (MOSA) on architecture
  • Range of non-essential to flight critical applications and the impact on future designs
  • Connected aircraft and design decisions for integrated designs

PRESENTER BIO

Timothy Etherington graduated from North Dakota State University with a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1987. Tim conducts flight deck research at NASA Langley Research Center and is recently retired from Collins Aerospace as a Technical Fellow. Mr. Etherington had worked at Rockwell Collins for over thirty years with extensive experience in military and commercial flight deck design and applied human factors. He helped design the flight decks for the Canadair Regional Jet and other business and regional primary flight display systems. He led the perspective, synthetic and enhanced flight deck research at Rockwell Collins including the flight-testing completed with NASA Langley and Air Force Research labs. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot certificate with a Citation Type Rating and holds commercial fixed wing and private pilot rotorcraft ratings. Mr. Etherington is co-chair for RTCA SC-213 working on standards for enhanced and synthetic vision systems.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
This tutorial explores architectures from numerous civil and military aircraft. Key architecture and design challenges are described for legacy as well as the newest aircraft types. Architectures are examined with comparisons of hardware and avionics functions of each are discussed in detail. Civil aircraft investigated include Boeing 787 and Airbus A350. Military aircraft include F-22 and Rafael. IMA 2G and other advanced concepts will be explored. Specific architecture examples are used to represent real word design challenges and solutions. Integrated and connected aircraft concepts are explored in reference to the integrated modular avionics architectures and how they can support integrated digital datalink and future air traffic management. Architectures have been carefully chosen to cover the following:

  • Broad spectrum of aircraft types, military and civilian
  • Federated and integrated designs with emphasis on the latest modern commercial and military aircraft
  • Emphasis on the latest integrated architectures with partitioning and connected aircraft
  • Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) vis-à-vis modular packaging
  • Impact of the Modular Open Systems Approach (MOSA) on architecture
  • Range of non-essential to flight critical applications and the impact on future designs
  • Connected aircraft and design decisions for integrated designs

PRESENTER BIO

Timothy Etherington graduated from North Dakota State University with a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1987. Tim conducts flight deck research at NASA Langley Research Center and is recently retired from Collins Aerospace as a Technical Fellow. Mr. Etherington had worked at Rockwell Collins for over thirty years with extensive experience in military and commercial flight deck design and applied human factors. He helped design the flight decks for the Canadair Regional Jet and other business and regional primary flight display systems. He led the perspective, synthetic and enhanced flight deck research at Rockwell Collins including the flight-testing completed with NASA Langley and Air Force Research labs. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot certificate with a Citation Type Rating and holds commercial fixed wing and private pilot rotorcraft ratings. Mr. Etherington is co-chair for RTCA SC-213 working on standards for enhanced and synthetic vision systems.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 11:30am – 2:30pm & 3:00pm – 6:00pm
This course offers a detailed look at basic spacecraft avionics systems engineering and design processes and principals. All spacecraft avionics systems have similarities, but differ in many ways. This course addresses the up-front systems engineering process; requirement levels, trade studies, requirements allocation/linking requirements derivation, requirements verification, risk and risk assessment, safety, integration and test, costing, scheduling, and then applying all this to the avionics subsystem level design on a subsystem-by-subsystem basis. Attendees will be exposed to avionics subsystem designs that are typically used on satellite buses and will learn the terms, nomenclature and rules of thumb used in the development process. Each avionics subsystem is explained in detail to gain insight into manpower and cost requirements. In addition to spacecraft avionics equipment, the design, fabrication, and qualification of the electrical ground support equipment required for satellites are discussed in detail.

Who Should Attend: 

Space, Spacecraft, and Launch Vehicle Systems Engineers, Avionics Subsystem Designers, Managers, Business Development personnel, System Safety Engineers, Risk Engineers and Managers, Electrical Ground Support Equipment Engineers, Integration and Test Engineers, and Environmental Test Engineers

What You Will Learn: 

Applying the systems engineering process and principles to the system level design, developing the overall and subsystem architectures and then down into each of the Avionics Subsystems. How the systems engineering process is applied to evaluate and determine the risks, safety, and trade studies to the requirements derivation process, subsystem design, and then requirements verification.

PRESENTER BIO: 

George Andrew has over 38 years of experience relating to spacecraft, space instrument and launch vehicle avionics architecture, design, manufacturing and testing

In addition, Mr. Andrew has extensive mission / systems engineering, and program/project management experience. He has consulted with start-up launch vehicle and spacecraft companies, managing the flight and ground hardware/software architecture, design, development, manufacturing, test, and launch. Mr. Andrew has been the program/project manager for several spacecraft program contracts and the Avionics Department Manager for two start-up launch vehicles. He is currently supporting the NASA Earth Science Program Office in the Program Systems Engineering office located at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

Mr. Andrew is President of GNA Aerospace Consulting Group and is an Associate Fellow within the AIAA.

UAS Track

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am

This tutorial will cover several aspects of the Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) concept as set forth by ICAO. First, we investigate the requirements described by relevant annexes to the convention of Chicago and the PBN manual ICAO Doc 9613.  Next, we quickly recapitulate the principles of GNSS operation and receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), which is required for the PBN implementation called required navigation performance or short RNP. Within RNP, the tutorial covers also RNP AR and the new advanced RNP concept. From an entirely aircraft-based navigation solution, we progress to augmentation systems such as provided via satellite link (such as the WAAS and EGNOS system) or ground stations (called GBAS or LAAS). For each of those systems the tutorial covers the principles of operation, computation of the augmented position solution and their implementation in operational use and associated benefits.

PRESENTER BIO

Thomas Dautermann received his undergraduate degree in physics from the Technical University of Kaiserslautern, followed by a MSc and PhD from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA. Since 2008 he has been working at the German Aerospace Center DLR as a researcher and project manager in the field of flight guidance and satellite navigation. Dr. Dautermann project management activities at DLR include for example, ACROSS and FILGAPP both FP7 project s as well as IMPROWE sponsored by the GSA. He has authored and co-authored several peer reviewed journal publication as well as many conference papers and represents DLR in the international expert groups LATO and PBN SG. Dr. Dautermann also holds commercial pilot’s licenses from the United States and Europe.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am

This tutorial will cover several aspects of the Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) concept as set forth by ICAO. First, we investigate the requirements described by relevant annexes to the convention of Chicago and the PBN manual ICAO Doc 9613.  Next, we quickly recapitulate the principles of GNSS operation and receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), which is required for the PBN implementation called required navigation performance or short RNP. Within RNP, the tutorial covers also RNP AR and the new advanced RNP concept. From an entirely aircraft-based navigation solution, we progress to augmentation systems such as provided via satellite link (such as the WAAS and EGNOS system) or ground stations (called GBAS or LAAS). For each of those systems the tutorial covers the principles of operation, computation of the augmented position solution and their implementation in operational use and associated benefits.

PRESENTER BIO

Thomas Dautermann received his undergraduate degree in physics from the Technical University of Kaiserslautern, followed by a MSc and PhD from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA. Since 2008 he has been working at the German Aerospace Center DLR as a researcher and project manager in the field of flight guidance and satellite navigation. Dr. Dautermann project management activities at DLR include for example, ACROSS and FILGAPP both FP7 project s as well as IMPROWE sponsored by the GSA. He has authored and co-authored several peer reviewed journal publication as well as many conference papers and represents DLR in the international expert groups LATO and PBN SG. Dr. Dautermann also holds commercial pilot’s licenses from the United States and Europe.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
This course provides a fundamental background in assured navigation for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). It first introduces the various UAS/RPAS application domains and operational environments, UAS flight management and path planning, required performance parameters, and autonomy at the various levels of the Guidance, Navigation and Control function. Furthermore, it addresses the foundations of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and inertial navigation and discusses the challenges of operating in the various target environments with sole-means GNSS. Next, augmentation methods and alternative navigation methods will be discussed with a focus on guaranteeing required navigation performance in, especially, GNSS-challenged environments. Finally, the course will talk about the role of the navigation function in surveillance, geo-fencing and relative navigation in case of swarms of UAS.

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Uijt de Haag is the Edmund K. Cheng Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a Principal Investigator (PI) with the Avionics Engineering Center at Ohio University since 1999.  He obtained his M.S.E.E. degree from Delft University in The Netherlands in 1994 and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio in 1999. He has authored or co-authored has authored or co-authored over 140 navigation-related publications and seven book chapters.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 3:00pm-6:00pm
In the latest years, sense and avoid (SAA), or detect and avoid (DAA), has represented one of the main roadblocks to the integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operations. This course outlines and reviews architectures, technologies, and algorithms for SAA. First, starting from a discussion about what constitutes a UAS and how it is different than manned aircraft, basic SAA definitions and taxonomies are discussed. Ground-based/airborne and cooperative/non-cooperative architectures are covered. The SAA process is dissected into its fundamental tasks, which are discussed in details. Different sensing algorithms and technologies are presented, including radar and optical systems. Potential and challenges of multi-sensor-based systems and data fusion are pointed out. Techniques for conflict detection, and approaches for remotely operated or autonomous avoidance are introduced. The tutorial ends with an overview of current perspectives and recent progress relevant to SAA for UAS integration in the Air Traffic Management (ATM) system and in the framework of UAS Traffic Management (UTM) / U-Space and Urban Air Mobility.  

 

PRESENTER BIO 

Giancarmine Fasano is Associate Professor at the University of Naples “Federico II”,  where he holds courses in “Unmanned Aircraft Systems” and “Space Flight Dynamics”.  His research activities in the field of aeronautics are focused on UAS, and in particular on sense and avoid and cooperative multi-UAV systems. In the space field he is mainly interested in distributed space systems and proximity operations, with emphasis on relative motion design and control. He is Member of the Avionics Systems Panel of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society and Associate Editor of the IEEE AESS Magazine for the UAS area of specialty. He is also Member of the AIAA Sensor Systems and Information Fusion Technical Committee and of the IAA Committee on Small Satellites. He has co-authored over 110 publications and five book chapters.

AIRCRAFT, ATM, AND CYBERSECURITY

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
This tutorial will provide a comprehensive overview of all the data communication technologies currently used or planned for introduction in the near future to support safety services for Air Traffic Management (ATM) and Advanced Air Mobility (AAM).  Tutorial segments will include air/ground access technologies, viz., VHF, UHF, L-band terrestrial, SATCOM, cellular, C-band AeroMACS for airport surface communications and C-band for UAS Command and Control (C2) as well as networking technologies such as Internet Protocol Suite (IPS) and Aeronautical Telecommunications Network Open Systems Interconnect (ATN/OSI).  Guidance will be provided for suitability of specific technology for specific use cases with discussions on pros and cons on each and possible implementation enhancements to overcome operational constraints.  The tutorial will introduce the cyber security risk assessments performed by ICAO and RTCA/EUROCAE for IPS and Future Communication Infrastructure; provide an overview of the cyber security policies and framework being standardized ICAO for aeronautical communications; cover the security requirements specified for IPS, UAS C2 Link System and explain how the requirements address the security controls specified in NIST standard 800-53 and FAA Order 1370-121A.

The tutorial is suitable for project managers, systems engineers, designers, and developers of communication systems supporting manned or unmanned aircraft operations who desire to have a broad understanding of technologies influencing current and future aviation.

PRESENTER BIO

Mr. Aloke Roy is the Managing Partner at Visionar Systems, LLC, which provides systems engineering services to the aerospace industry. Mr. Roy covers technology research on artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security and wireless communications. Prior to this, Mr. Roy was with Honeywell Advanced Technology organization managing data communication, information security and radio technology development programs supporting Honeywell Aerospace. Previously, Mr. Roy was Director of Programs at Flextronics Corporation managing several major telecommunications OEM accounts. In this role, Mr. Roy was responsible for business development, outsourcing, and globalization of hardware design

activities supporting large volume contract electronic manufacturing. His prior experiences include various positions at AT&T Bell Laboratories and ARINC Aviation Systems Division. As Systems Engineering Director at ARINC, Mr. Roy oversaw development of SATCOM, HF, VDL, ATIS, and PDC standards and services. Currently, Mr. Roy chairs RTCA Special Committee 223, which is developing the Aviation Internet Protocol and Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communication System requirements and operational performance standards. Mr. Roy is an advisor to FAA on communication and cyber security technologies and participates at ICAO Communications Panel on behalf of FAA. Mr. Roy holds several patents on aeronautical, wireless and secure communications. He was the President (2017-2018) of a Maryland-DC- Virginia volunteer cultural organization with 1000+ members; the Chair of IEEE AESS Avionics Systems Panel (2019-2020); General Conference Chair of DASC 2019 and ICNS 2017.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
This tutorial will provide a comprehensive overview of all the data communication technologies currently used or planned for introduction in the near future to support safety services for Air Traffic Management (ATM) and Advanced Air Mobility (AAM).  Tutorial segments will include air/ground access technologies, viz., VHF, UHF, L-band terrestrial, SATCOM, cellular, C-band AeroMACS for airport surface communications and C-band for UAS Command and Control (C2) as well as networking technologies such as Internet Protocol Suite (IPS) and Aeronautical Telecommunications Network Open Systems Interconnect (ATN/OSI).  Guidance will be provided for suitability of specific technology for specific use cases with discussions on pros and cons on each and possible implementation enhancements to overcome operational constraints.  The tutorial will introduce the cyber security risk assessments performed by ICAO and RTCA/EUROCAE for IPS and Future Communication Infrastructure; provide an overview of the cyber security policies and framework being standardized ICAO for aeronautical communications; cover the security requirements specified for IPS, UAS C2 Link System and explain how the requirements address the security controls specified in NIST standard 800-53 and FAA Order 1370-121A.

The tutorial is suitable for project managers, systems engineers, designers, and developers of communication systems supporting manned or unmanned aircraft operations who desire to have a broad understanding of technologies influencing current and future aviation.

PRESENTER BIO

Mr. Aloke Roy is the Managing Partner at Visionar Systems, LLC, which provides systems engineering services to the aerospace industry. Mr. Roy covers technology research on artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security and wireless communications. Prior to this, Mr. Roy was with Honeywell Advanced Technology organization managing data communication, information security and radio technology development programs supporting Honeywell Aerospace. Previously, Mr. Roy was Director of Programs at Flextronics Corporation managing several major telecommunications OEM accounts. In this role, Mr. Roy was responsible for business development, outsourcing, and globalization of hardware design activities supporting large volume contract electronic manufacturing. His prior experiences include various positions at AT&T Bell Laboratories and ARINC Aviation Systems Division. As Systems Engineering Director at ARINC, Mr. Roy oversaw development of SATCOM, HF, VDL, ATIS, and PDC standards and services. Currently, Mr. Roy chairs RTCA Special Committee 223, which is developing the Aviation Internet Protocol and Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communication System requirements and operational performance standards. Mr. Roy is an advisor to FAA on communication and cyber security technologies and participates at ICAO Communications Panel on behalf of FAA. Mr. Roy holds several patents on aeronautical, wireless and secure communications. He was the President (2017-2018) of a Maryland-DC- Virginia volunteer cultural organization with 1000+ members; the Chair of IEEE AESS Avionics Systems Panel (2019-2020); General Conference Chair of DASC 2019 and ICNS 2017.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
The cyber threat landscape of aviation is increasing. Threats bring new security risks that are specific to aviation and impact public safety and well-being. This tutorial will introduce you to aviation cyber security, focusing on the aircraft at the center of an increasingly complex and technology-driven aviation ecosystem. Upon completion of this tutorial, you will be able to comprehensively summarize and skillfully analyze today’s aviation cyber security landscape including both crewed and uncrewed aircraft. You will be able to differentiate real from perceived as well as current from future threats. You will be able to recall aviation and cyber security terminology, explain cyber security essentials, and illustrate how cyber security applies to the passenger carrying aircraft, UAS aircraft, and their supporting systems. Using examples and case studies, you will be able to evaluate threats from vulnerabilities as well as risks from threats to these systems. You will be able to recognize, examine, and compare some of the state-of-the-art and recent advances in aviation cyber security, including those related to avionics, crew, and aircraft, air traffic control, UAS, and UTM systems. 

 

PRESENTER BIO

Krishna Sampigethaya is currently the Chair for the Department of Cyber Intelligence and Security at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, AZ. https://prescott.erau.edu/cyber. The department is DHS/NSA CAE-CD designated, ABET-Cyber accredited, US Cyber Command AEN member, DoD Cyber Scholarship winner, and part of the only NSF SFS institution for aviation and aerospace cyber security.

Krishna received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Washington (2007) and was one of the first in the world to defend a thesis on connected vehicle privacy and aviation cyber security research. He then joined The Boeing Company and was soon selected as the first Boeing Associate Technical Fellow for aviation cyber-physical security in 2012. Most recently he was an Associate Director for cyber security at the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Research Center (2016-2018), focusing on the security of aerospace systems and commercial products. He has also been an Assistant Director for the Masters in Telecom program at the University of Maryland (2014-2015), developing new courses on software-defined networks and connected vehicles.

Krishna founded the first aviation cyber security technical committee, sponsored by the SAE in 2008, and has been organizing aviation cyber security tracks at SAE as well as AIAA/IEEE conferences since then. He co-edited the first special issue on cyber-physical systems, published in the first centennial year issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE journal (2012). He has authored over 50 papers—including 3 award-winning publications (at IEEE DASC and I-CNS)—delivered over 16 keynotes and holds over 16 US patents in aviation cyber security. His work has been recognized in the community with awards such as the American Society of Engineers of Indian Origin (ASEI) Engineer of the Year Award (2013), ASEI Corporate Engineering Excellence Award (2013), and a Best Instructor Award at UMD (2015). Most recently, he led a team of Embry-Riddle cybersecurity program students to design the first aviation cybersecurity competition at the DEF CON Aerospace Village, AIAA, Aviation ISAC, and DHS ACI.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 3:00pm-6:00pm
ARP4754A established an ordered process for engineering aircraft and avionics systems.  While ARP4754A has brought order to the chaos, it has been stretched to the limit in some areas.  Enter the follow-on, ARP4754B: building upon the strengths (and learning from the weaknesses), ARP4754B is primed to lead us into the future.  But what can we expect?  What will change?  What will stay the same?  How can YOU succeed in aviation development via ARP4754B? This AFuzion tutorial will delve into the changes you can expect as ARP4764B emerges and how to succeed in modern aircraft and avionics systems development.  Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Hebert has broad experience in the systems and software development.  His career includes both a decorated military career and an equally lauded career in civil aviation.  Over his 45+ year career he has had the opportunity to both participate in and lead systems and software development projects, establish protocols for evaluating systems and software products, and lead systems and software process improvement initiatives.  His work has resulted in practical applications of the CMMI, AS9115, NASA-STD-7150.2, DO-178, and ARP-4754A as he has focused on helping clients worldwide adapt their processes and performance to meet the demands of the aerospace community while retaining the benefits of modern software development methods.

AUTONOMY IN AVIATION- I

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
As airborne systems become more and more complex – partly in order to “off load” aircrews, the certification of such systems becomes even more challenging, as the emphasis shifts from the complexity of human behavior to the even greater complexities of systems and software.

For over a decade now, tools (DO-330) and models (DO-331), used for the development of airborne systems and software, need to be qualified, as well as non-deterministic software development techniques such as Object-Oriented (DO-332) – and more guides and standards keep evolving for yet more complex and sophisticated techniques, such as Artificial-Intelligence (AI) / Machine-Learning (ML).

This 3-hour fast-paced course will introduce attendees to the background, structure, basic concepts and essential practices of the DO-178C supplements DO-330/331/332/333. A brief review of the road ahead and the new paradigms being developed, especially for AI/ML – will wrap up this tutorial. Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/     

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Attendees may include managers, engineers, quality assurance, certification personnel – as well as aircraft manufacturers, operators, maintainers, service providers and other aviation stakeholders, who need to prepare for Cyber-Security regulatory compliance of their aircraft/systems/organizations.          

PRESENTER BIO

Aharon David is the Chief WHO (White Hat Officer) of AFuzion-InfoSec, providing Aviation Cyber-Security Certification training & consulting services worldwide. Since 1981, Mr. Aharon David has worked in engineering of software and systems avionics, including junior-to-senior technical management positions. Among other duties, Mr. David served as the commander of the Israeli Air Force’s Avionics & Control Software-development Center (ACSC) and head of System-Engineering & Interoperability of the Israeli Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) – and along the way developed, taught & commanded technical courses in the US and Israel, and was a speaker at international technical conferences.

In recent years, Mr. David has been a senior advisor to the Civil Air Authority of Israel (CAAI), specifically on software certification and Cyber-Security. He is currently a member of both RTCA’s SC-216 & EUROCAE’s WG-72 “Aeronautical Systems Security“, as well as all other aviation cyber-security standard-making committees, such as SAE G-32 “Cyber Physical Systems Cybersecurity” – on which he is the editor of the next-generation standard, and many others.

Mr. David holds a BSc in Aerospace Engineering from the Technion – Israel’s Institute of Technology, and an MBA from the Tel-Aviv University.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
As airborne systems become more and more complex – partly in order to “off load” aircrews, the certification of such systems becomes even more challenging, as the emphasis shifts from the complexity of human behavior to the even greater complexities of systems and software.

For over a decade now, tools (DO-330) and models (DO-331), used for the development of airborne systems and software, need to be qualified, as well as non-deterministic software development techniques such as Object-Oriented (DO-332) – and more guides and standards keep evolving for yet more complex and sophisticated techniques, such as Artificial-Intelligence (AI) / Machine-Learning (ML).

This 3-hour fast-paced course will introduce attendees to the background, structure, basic concepts and essential practices of the DO-178C supplements DO-330/331/332/333. A brief review of the road ahead and the new paradigms being developed, especially for AI/ML – will wrap up this tutorial. Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/     

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Attendees may include managers, engineers, quality assurance, certification personnel – as well as aircraft manufacturers, operators, maintainers, service providers and other aviation stakeholders, who need to prepare for Cyber-Security regulatory compliance of their aircraft/systems/organizations.          

PRESENTER BIO

Aharon David is the Chief WHO (White Hat Officer) of AFuzion-InfoSec, providing Aviation Cyber-Security Certification training & consulting services worldwide. Since 1981, Mr. Aharon David has worked in engineering of software and systems avionics, including junior-to-senior technical management positions. Among other duties, Mr. David served as the commander of the Israeli Air Force’s Avionics & Control Software-development Center (ACSC) and head of System-Engineering & Interoperability of the Israeli Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) – and along the way developed, taught & commanded technical courses in the US and Israel, and was a speaker at international technical conferences.

In recent years, Mr. David has been a senior advisor to the Civil Air Authority of Israel (CAAI), specifically on software certification and Cyber-Security. He is currently a member of both RTCA’s SC-216 & EUROCAE’s WG-72 “Aeronautical Systems Security“, as well as all other aviation cyber-security standard-making committees, such as SAE G-32 “Cyber Physical Systems Cybersecurity” – on which he is the editor of the next-generation standard, and many others.

Mr. David holds a BSc in Aerospace Engineering from the Technion – Israel’s Institute of Technology, and an MBA from the Tel-Aviv University.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
The use of remotely-operated vehicles is ultimately limited by economic support costs, and the presence and skills from human operators (pilots). Unmanned craft have the potential to operate with greatly reduced overhead costs and level of operator intervention. The challenging design is for a system that deploys a team of Unmanned Vehicles (UVs) and can perform complex tasks reliably and with minimal (remote) pilot intervention. A critical issue to achieve this is to develop a system with the ability to deal with internal faults, and changes in the environment as well as their impact on sensor outputs used for the planning phase.

The tutorial objective is to present step by step the development process (from requirements to prototyping) of an Intelligent Vehicle Control Architecture (IVCA) that enables multiple collaborating UVs to autonomously carry out missions. The architectural foundation to achieve the IVCA lays on the flexibility of service-oriented computing and agent software technology. An ontological database captures the remote pilot skills, platform capabilities and, changes in the environment. The information captured (stored as knowledge) enables reasoning agents to plan missions based on the current situation. The combination of the two above paradigms makes it possible to develop an IVCA that is able to dynamically reconfigure and adapt itself in order to deal with changes in the operation environment. The ability to perform on-the-fly re-planning of activities when needed increases the chance to succeed in a given mission. The IVCA realization is underpinned by the development of fault-tolerant planning and spooling modules (fault diagnosis and recovery) as well as a module called matchmaker to link services with available capabilities.

The IVCA is generic in nature and can be easily adapted to UVs from different domains (i.e. land, water, and air/space). However, the IVCA aims at a case study where Unmanned Marine Vehicles (UMVs) are required to work cooperatively. They are capable of cooperating autonomously towards the execution of complex activities since they have different but complementary capabilities. The above UMV configuration, where the marine robots are tasked to autonomously do mission works before recovery, is possible at a cost of endowing the UMVs with “intelligence” that in former solutions is provided by remote or even in-situ human pilots.

The IVCA development applies the software/systems engineering principles. The tutorial is structured in four parts. Part I (background) consists of a brief review of technologies related to the IVCA and a comparison of control architectures for autonomous UVs. Part II (requirements analysis and design) entails the user and system requirements, and the system architecture specification/design. Part III (implementation and integration) describes the IVCA realization based on Robot Operating System (ROS) for the above case study. Session IV (verification and validation) deal

 

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Carlos C. Insaurralde is a Senior Lecturer in Electronic Engineering in the Department of Engineering Design and Mathematics, University of the West of England, UK. His roles are Programme Leader BEng(Hons) Robotics and Module leader for courses from the Electronic Engineering and Robotics programmes. He received the MEng degree in Electronics from the National University of Cordoba, Argentina, in 1999, the MAst and PhD degrees in Computer Engineering (Mention “Doctor Europaeus” accredited by the European University Association) from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain, in 2005 and 2007 respectively, and the MPhil degree in Electrical Engineering from Heriot-Watt University, UK in 2014. He also received a PgCert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education from Teesside University, UK in 2017. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA), UK and an IEEE Senior Member.

Dr Insaurralde has worked in collaboration with EADS (Airbus and Eurocopter), and BAE Systems as well as in different industrial sectors (aerospace, defense, maritime, and industrial automation). He has over twenty years of hands-on experience in software engineering, including over ten years of engineering research experience in robotics and autonomous systems. He is author of over eighty international publications, including a book and five book chapters. He is also author of fifteen technical project reports. His background is in architectures of intelligent and autonomous systems, multidisciplinary development of high-integrity systems, and metric assessment of systems performance. His research interest mainly focuses on intelligent automation and autonomy, including decision-making support for Air Traffic Management (ATM).

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022 | 3:00pm-6:00pm

This tutorial will cover: (1) Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) also known as Machine Self-Awareness, (2) Trust and Ethical Consideration in the Pursuit of Autonomous Agents, and (3) Toward Airworthiness Certification for Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Aerospace Systems.

(1) Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) also known as Machine Self-Awareness: Current and future research that embodies a pathway to achieving machine common sense (MCS) and Artificial General Intelligence will be discussed (Harbour, Clark, Mitchell, & Vemuru, 2019). The future frontier may well involve a framework that is capable of machine curiosity, exploration, automatic self-direction, and adaptation. This includes Neuroscience, Neuromorphic Engineering, Hebbian Plasticity Theory, Dual Process Theory, Machine Awareness and Consciousness (MAC). The artificial intelligence (AI) system of the future will possess an innate curiosity and explore its own environment to gain knowledge, exhibiting a basic element of human cognition and awareness. The resulting MA system will possess inherent self-driven curiosity and related entropy in the decision space as it explores the environment in much the same manner as humans do. 

(2) Trust and Ethical Consideration in the Pursuit of Autonomous Agents: As autonomous systems continue to proliferate across manufacturing, economic, legal, medical, aerospace, and social realms, ethical guidelines must be established to not only protect humans at the mercy of decision making, but also the autonomous agents themselves, should they become conscious. The authors seek to spark dialogue and preventative action, so proper legal and operational requirements can be established prior to any agent acquiring even an inkling of consciousness, and to reduce the likelihood of unintentional damage posed to humans (O’Grady, Harbour, Abballe, & Cohen, 2022). 

(3) Toward Airworthiness Certification for Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Aerospace Systems: With the growth of AI and its immense potential, there is also a clear and distinct need for safety assurance. Moreover, the traditional, offline test-based approaches for verification evidence pose challenges due to the stochastic and complex nature of intelligent systems. This will present various considerations to enable the development of certification criteria for AI when consulting aerospace system design guidance and standards, including MIL-HDBK-516C, DO-178, and FAA’s Standard Airworthiness Certification Regulations (Henderson, Harbour, & Cohen, 2022). 

PRESENTER BIOS

Dr. Steven D. Harbour (primary instructor), PhD. Staff Engineer & Scientist, Dayton Engineering Advanced Projects Lab, Avionics Department, Div. 16, Southwest Research Institute. SME in Neuromorphic Engineering, Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning, Human Autonomy Teaming, Neuroscience, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Avionics, UAS and Autonomous vehicles. A senior leader, defense research & engineering professional with over 25 years of experience in multiple engineering and aviation disciplines & applications. Leads and performs ongoing basic and applied research projects, including the development of third generation spiking neural networks (SNNs) and neuromorphic applications to include Human Autonomy Teaming. He has supported the Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and at the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center in the ISR / SOF directorate as the Global Hawk Chief of Avionics Engineering and Modernization Programs. USAF test pilot with over 5,000 hours total flying time in F-16, F-4, AT-38, T-37, B-52, and EC- 135 aircraft. Flew the MIG-29 as part of the US State Department’s military to military visit program under the Nunn-Lugar Act.  PhD in Neuroscience (Specializations: Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning and Neuroergonomics), MS in Aerospace Engineering & Mathematics (Specializations: Avionics, Controls & Displays), BS in Electrical Engineering (Specializations: Robotics & Feedback Control Systems and Cognition). Dr. Harbour also teaches at the University of Dayton & Sinclair College.

Ms. Katherine O’Grady (second instructor) is an Engineer in the Dayton Engineering Advanced Projects Lab, Avionics Department, Div. 16, Southwest Research Institute. Her current research focuses on the development of biologically inspired artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to fuel AI agent decision-making. She performs applied research, supporting intelligent solutions projects for defense-related applications, including human-machine teaming and autonomous systems. Ms. O’Grady also teaches perception and AI coursework at Sinclair College. Prior to her current roles, she worked in the Immunochemical Core Laboratory at Mayo Clinic, where she led the development of mass spectrometry assays. Ms. O’Grady holds a M.Eng. in AI from the University of Cincinnati, OH, and a B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship with a Chemistry Minor from the University of Miami, FL. She is set to continue her education at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California, San Francisco for her joint-Ph.D. in Bioengineering.

Mr. Alex Henderson (third instructor). Research Engineer, Dayton Engineering Advanced Projects Lab, Avionics Department, Div. 16, Southwest Research Institute. Alex’s research focuses on the development of neuromorphic architectures for low size, weight, and power processing with third generation spiking neural networks (SNNs). He also performs applied research, supporting projects that enable intelligent solutions for defense-based applications, including human-machine interfaces, avionics sensor fusion, and autonomous systems. In the past, he has supported the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio under the PAQ program, where he developed guidance on airworthiness certification for complex systems. He currently holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Dayton. He is now pursuing a PhD at the University of Dayton, where he will focus on spiking neural network hardware design. Alex also teaches Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Aviation at Sinclair College. 

DAY 2

AUTONOMY IN AVIATION - II

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
In this course we are going to introduce concepts of decision making conducted by algorithms which led to current term Artificial Intelligence. The course is built around flight planning algorithms, their performance and suitability for different applications. Within our session we will focus on and summarize advantages and disadvantages of Breadth First Search, A*, Iterative Deepening A*, Theta*, and RRT* algorithms. Their reasoning process and path selection methodology with perspective of aerospace requirements are evaluated. Our focus will be on the randomization element and uncertainty of these algorithms. We will also describe selected evaluation parameters required by FAA and EASA Technical Standard Order (TSO) documents on electronic systems and what are the conflicts between these requirements and the natural principle of the existing path-planning algorithms. The influence of the performance of the navigation sensors and expected departure and arrival procedures which use the existing navigation means (INS, VOR, NDB, ILS, GPS) will be discussed. Finally, we describe the Artificial Intelligence phenomena and discuss the determinism of the currently used algorithms for flight-path panning and recovery.

 PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Pavel Paces is currently member of Artificial Intelligence Center and Department of Aerospace Technologies at Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. He graduated from Electrical Engineering in 2005 and got his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering in 2011 at the same university. Pavel has past experience with aerospace sensors development, flight simulators certification and business development.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
In this course we are going to introduce concepts of decision making conducted by algorithms which led to current term Artificial Intelligence. The course is built around flight planning algorithms, their performance and suitability for different applications. Within our session we will focus on and summarize advantages and disadvantages of Breadth First Search, A*, Iterative Deepening A*, Theta*, and RRT* algorithms. Their reasoning process and path selection methodology with perspective of aerospace requirements are evaluated. Our focus will be on the randomization element and uncertainty of these algorithms. We will also describe selected evaluation parameters required by FAA and EASA Technical Standard Order (TSO) documents on electronic systems and what are the conflicts between these requirements and the natural principle of the existing path-planning algorithms. The influence of the performance of the navigation sensors and expected departure and arrival procedures which use the existing navigation means (INS, VOR, NDB, ILS, GPS) will be discussed. Finally, we describe the Artificial Intelligence phenomena and discuss the determinism of the currently used algorithms for flight-path panning and recovery.

 PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Pavel Paces is currently member of Artificial Intelligence Center and Department of Aerospace Technologies at Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. He graduated from Electrical Engineering in 2005 and got his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering in 2011 at the same university. Pavel has past experience with aerospace sensors development, flight simulators certification and business development.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
In this course we will explore the term machine learning and define algorithms to be generally considered as machine learning. The course is built around use cases where machine learning can provide advantage in form of time and cost savings. We are going to link the use of machine learning to existing algorithms used for system diagnostics which include signal processing algorithms, feature extraction and classification methods. The tutorial will begin with Signal to Noise Ratio, variance, Standard Deviation and FFT which can be used for unsupervised, supervised and reinforcement learning where such as regression, k-nearest neighbors and other algorithms are used. The tutorial will also introduce the basics of the neural networks, their design and pros and cons with explanation why certification authorities do not accept systems using neural networks for safety critical applications. The tutorial will be concluded by explanations of statistics used in navigation data processing algorithms and a use case utilizing machine learning with data classification algorithms for automatic recurrent testing of avionics software modifications.

 PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Pavel Paces is currently member of Artificial Intelligence Center and Department of Aerospace Technologies at Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. He graduated from Electrical Engineering in 2005 and got his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering in 2011 at the same university. Pavel has past experience with aerospace sensors development, flight simulators certification and business development.

AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS AND STANDARDS

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
Digital aviation systems designers are being asked to provide more sophisticated autonomous and semi-autonomous features for aerospace systems including general aviation and UAS much like automotive AV/ADAS (Autonomous Vehicle/Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems) is challenging automotive embedded systems.  Traditionally many of these systems have been modular AMP (Asymmetric Multi-Processing) systems that run simpler cyclic executives for hard real-time mission critical computation with clear separation via standardized interfaces from core flight control and management to less critical planning and convenience features.  New features may range from soft real-time or interactive assistant features that enhance flight optimization and planning to the more traditional mission critical flight control systems.  The drive to integrate assistant and autonomous features is a combined opportunity and challenge for embedded system hardware, firmware, and software systems engineering.  This tutorial will introduce you to the challenges, opportunities and the latest hardware, firmware and software tools and practices.  You will emerge with a fundamental understanding of concepts and theory, both proven, and more emergent to consider for future projects.  You will gain a clear review and understanding of traditional rate monotonic, provably safe, systems design as well as emerging methods using RTOS and Linux systems to integrate new assistant and autonomy features.

RESENTER BIO

Dr. Sam Siewert has a B.S. in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering from University of Notre Dame and M.S., Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of Colorado. He has worked in the computer engineering industry for twenty-four years before starting an academic career in 2012.  Dr. Siewert spent half of those 24 years in industry on NASA astronautics and deep space exploration programs and the next half on commercial product development for high performance computing, networking and storage systems. In 2020, Dr. Siewert joined California State University Chico to teach parallel and numerical computing, software engineering and applied computer vision.  He retains an adjunct position for research with Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Prescott and he continues an adjunct professor role at University of Colorado Boulder teaching summer programs in real-time systems and embedded machine vision. His, research interests include real-time systems, interactive systems, machine vision and machine learning applied to UAS/UAV and urban air mobility traffic management, safety and security.  Dr. Siewert was a co-founder of the Embedded Systems Engineering program at University of Colorado.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
Digital aviation systems designers are being asked to provide more sophisticated autonomous and semi-autonomous features for aerospace systems including general aviation and UAS much like automotive AV/ADAS (Autonomous Vehicle/Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems) is challenging automotive embedded systems.  Traditionally many of these systems have been modular AMP (Asymmetric Multi-Processing) systems that run simpler cyclic executives for hard real-time mission critical computation with clear separation via standardized interfaces from core flight control and management to less critical planning and convenience features.  New features may range from soft real-time or interactive assistant features that enhance flight optimization and planning to the more traditional mission critical flight control systems.  The drive to integrate assistant and autonomous features is a combined opportunity and challenge for embedded system hardware, firmware, and software systems engineering.  This tutorial will introduce you to the challenges, opportunities and the latest hardware, firmware and software tools and practices.  You will emerge with a fundamental understanding of concepts and theory, both proven, and more emergent to consider for future projects.  You will gain a clear review and understanding of traditional rate monotonic, provably safe, systems design as well as emerging methods using RTOS and Linux systems to integrate new assistant and autonomy features.

RESENTER BIO

Dr. Sam Siewert has a B.S. in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering from University of Notre Dame and M.S., Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of Colorado. He has worked in the computer engineering industry for twenty-four years before starting an academic career in 2012.  Dr. Siewert spent half of those 24 years in industry on NASA astronautics and deep space exploration programs and the next half on commercial product development for high performance computing, networking and storage systems. In 2020, Dr. Siewert joined California State University Chico to teach parallel and numerical computing, software engineering and applied computer vision.  He retains an adjunct position for research with Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Prescott and he continues an adjunct professor role at University of Colorado Boulder teaching summer programs in real-time systems and embedded machine vision. His, research interests include real-time systems, interactive systems, machine vision and machine learning applied to UAS/UAV and urban air mobility traffic management, safety and security.  Dr. Siewert was a co-founder of the Embedded Systems Engineering program at University of Colorado.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
The international standards D-326A (U.S.) and ED-202A (Europe) titled “Airworthiness Security Process Specification” are the cornerstones of the “DO-326/ED-202 Set”: the only Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC 20-42) by EASA for aviation cyber-security airworthiness certification, as of Jan 1st, 2021, and enroute to becoming such by the FAA. The “DO-326/ED-202 Set” includes, in addition to DO-326A/ED-202A, the companion documents DO-356A/ED-203A: “Airworthiness Security Methods and Considerations”, DO-355(A)/ED-204(A): “Information Security Guidance for Continuing Airworthiness” & ED-201(A)/DO-391: “Aeronautical Information System Security (AISS) Framework Guidance”, and the upcoming ED-205(A)/DO-393: “Process Standard for Security Certification / Declaration of Air Traffic Management / Air Navigation Services (ATM/ANS) Ground Systems“ & ED-206/DO-392“Guidance on Information Security Event Management”.

This 3-hour fast-paced course will introduce attendees to the background, structure, basic concepts and essential practices, as well as the gaps and challenges of this new, mandatory, set of standards. A brief review of the road ahead and the upcoming upgrades from various sources – will wrap up this tutorial. Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/           

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Attendees may include managers, engineers, quality assurance, certification personnel – as well as aircraft manufacturers, operators, maintainers, service providers and other aviation stakeholders, who need to prepare for Cyber-Security regulatory compliance of their aircraft/systems/organizations.

PRESENTER BIO

Aharon David is the Chief WHO (White Hat Officer) of AFuzion-InfoSec, providing Aviation Cyber-Security Certification training & consulting services worldwide. Since 1981, Mr. Aharon David has worked in engineering of software and systems avionics, including junior-to-senior technical management positions. Among other duties, Mr. David served as the commander of the Israeli Air Force’s Avionics & Control Software-development Center (ACSC) and head of System-Engineering & Interoperability of the Israeli Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) – and along the way developed, taught & commanded technical courses in the US and Israel, and was a speaker at international technical conferences.

In recent years, Mr. David has been a senior advisor to the Civil Air Authority of Israel (CAAI), specifically on software certification and Cyber-Security. He is currently a member of both RTCA’s SC-216 & EUROCAE’s WG-72 “Aeronautical Systems Security“, as well as all other aviation cyber-security standard-making committees, such as SAE G-32 “Cyber Physical Systems Cybersecurity” – on which he is the editor of the next-generation standard, and many others.

Mr. David holds a BSc in Aerospace Engineering from the Technion – Israel’s Institute of Technology, and an MBA from the Tel-Aviv University.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 3:00pm-6:00pm
SAE’s ARP4761: “Guidelines and Methods for Conducting the Safety Assessment Process on Civil Airborne Systems and Equipment” has been the “law of the land” for airborne systems certification for over a quarter of a century, since 1996. But now – a change is coming: the new ARP4761A: “Guidelines and Methods for Conducting the Safety Assessment Process on Civil Airborne Systems and Equipment”, aligned with the new ARP4754B: “Guidelines for Development of Civil Aircraft and Systems” is being published this year. This new document, long due, introduces improved alignment with its companion document, ARP4754B, new methodologies and improved clarity. Yet – there are already new safety paradigms warming up at SAE’s S-18, the developing committee of ARP4761 & ARP4754, that are poised to reshape aviation safety later this decade – and beyond.

This 3-hour fast-paced course will introduce attendees to the background, structure, basic concepts and essential practices of ARP4761A, focusing on the updates from ARP4761. A brief review of the road ahead and the new paradigms being developed – will wrap up this tutorial.

Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/           

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Attendees may include managers, engineers, quality assurance, certification personnel – as well as aircraft manufacturers, operators, maintainers, service providers and other aviation stakeholders, who need to prepare for Cyber-Security regulatory compliance of their aircraft/systems/organizations.

PRESENTER BIO

Aharon David is the Chief WHO (White Hat Officer) of AFuzion-InfoSec, providing Aviation Cyber-Security Certification training & consulting services worldwide. Since 1981, Mr. Aharon David has worked in engineering of software and systems avionics, including junior-to-senior technical management positions. Among other duties, Mr. David served as the commander of the Israeli Air Force’s Avionics & Control Software-development Center (ACSC) and head of System-Engineering & Interoperability of the Israeli Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) – and along the way developed, taught & commanded technical courses in the US and Israel, and was a speaker at international technical conferences.

In recent years, Mr. David has been a senior advisor to the Civil Air Authority of Israel (CAAI), specifically on software certification and Cyber-Security. He is currently a member of both RTCA’s SC-216 & EUROCAE’s WG-72, “Aeronautical Systems Security,” as well as all other aviation cyber-security standard-making committees, such as SAE G-32 “Cyber Physical Systems Cybersecurity” – on which he is the editor of the next-generation standard, and many others.

Mr. David holds a BSc in Aerospace Engineering from the Technion – Israel’s Institute of Technology, and an MBA from the Tel-Aviv University.

Certification

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
DO-178C was released in 2012.  What have we learned over the last decade?  Are there common DO-178C mistakes?  Can they be avoided?  As the world’s largest DO-178C services company, AFuzion has seen (and helped resolve) a vast array of problems with DO-178C deployment. Learn DO-178C best practice and common mistake –with practical ways to avoid them (or at least mitigate them). Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Hebert has broad experience in the systems and software development.  His career includes both a decorated military career and an equally lauded career in civil aviation.  Over his 45+ year career he has had the opportunity to both participate in and lead systems and software development projects, establish protocols for evaluating systems and software products, and lead systems and software process improvement initiatives.  His work has resulted in practical applications of the CMMI, AS9115, NASA-STD-7150.2, DO-178, and ARP-4754A as he has focused on helping clients worldwide adapt their processes and performance to meet the demands of the aerospace community while retaining the benefits of modern software development methods.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
DO-178C was released in 2012.  What have we learned over the last decade?  Are there common DO-178C mistakes?  Can they be avoided?  As the world’s largest DO-178C services company, AFuzion has seen (and helped resolve) a vast array of problems with DO-178C deployment. Learn DO-178C best practice and common mistake –with practical ways to avoid them (or at least mitigate them). Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Hebert has broad experience in the systems and software development.  His career includes both a decorated military career and an equally lauded career in civil aviation.  Over his 45+ year career he has had the opportunity to both participate in and lead systems and software development projects, establish protocols for evaluating systems and software products, and lead systems and software process improvement initiatives.  His work has resulted in practical applications of the CMMI, AS9115, NASA-STD-7150.2, DO-178, and ARP-4754A as he has focused on helping clients worldwide adapt their processes and performance to meet the demands of the aerospace community while retaining the benefits of modern software development methods.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 11:30am-2:30pm
Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are critical for the safe operations of complex, hazard- sensitive systems. The SOPs are particularity important for dealing with non-normal operations in which the human operator must intervene and/or provide instructions to the automation. The SOPs must be completed within an Allowable Operational Time Window (AOTW) to avert a

hazardous outcome. In many cases, the AOTW is not fixed, but exhibits variance due to complex non-linear, plant dynamics. The Time on Procedure (ToP) is also subject to variability due to human factors such as experience, proficiency, fatigue, and the efficacy of the SOPs and the supporting automation user-interface. For this reason, it is critical to evaluate the dynamic performance of the SOP in the context of the operations and determine the likelihood of the ToP exceeding the AOTW.

This tutorial describes how to model SOPs and perform SOP analysis using LML/SysML Action/Activity Diagrams that can be found in most Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE) tools. The method enables the SOP designer to assess the performance of the SOP by accounting for human factors and operation dynamics. The ability to test the procedures in a MBSE tool can inform the system design and verify the procedure design early in the development lifecycle

Intended audience: Engineers responsible for design, testing and/or certification of avionics equipment, training or procedures.

PRESENTERS BIO

Dr. Lance Sherry, is Associate Professor of Systems Engineering and Operations Research at George Mason University. Dr Sherry also serves as the Director of the Center for Air Transportation Systems Research at George Mason University. Dr. Sherry has over 30 years experience in the industry ranging from flight test, avionics design and certification, program management, strategic planning, and research. He has published over 100 papers and journal articles, holds several patents, and has received several awards for his work. [email protected]

Dr. Steve Dam is the President and Founder of the Systems and Proposal Engineering Company (SPEC), based in Marshall, VA. He has been involved with structured analysis, software development, and system engineering for over 40 years. Dr. Dam is the author of two systems engineering-based books: “DoD Architecture Framework: A Guide to Applying System Engineering to Develop Integrated, Executable Architectures and Real MBSE: Model-Based

Systems Engineering Using LML and Innoslate. Dr. Dam has delivered numerous tutorials at INCOSE and NDIA events. Dr. Dam is a certified ESEP. [email protected]

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 3:00pm-6:00pm
One of the most discussed (and often misunderstood) topics in software engineering is “Agile Development”.  It has been shown to be incredibly effective at reducing both cost and schedule in many different contexts.  What about Safety-Critical software?  Can the benefits of Agile be exploited without sacrificing safety for aviation software such as DO-178C and DO-278A?  AFuzion will show you how to integrate Agile into your Aviation software development. Attendees may select three proprietary whitepapers addressing this topic which you select here to waive the normal $50/paper fee; only via DASC: https://afuzion.com/avionics-safety-critical-training-whitepapers/

PRESENTER BIO

Dr. Hebert has broad experience in the systems and software development.  His career includes both a decorated military career and an equally lauded career in civil aviation.  Over his 45+ year career he has had the opportunity to both participate in and lead systems and software development projects, establish protocols for evaluating systems and software products, and lead systems and software process improvement initiatives.  His work has resulted in practical applications of the CMMI, AS9115, NASA-STD-7150.2, DO-178, and ARP-4754A as he has focused on helping clients worldwide adapt their processes and performance to meet the demands of the aerospace community while retaining the benefits of modern software development methods.

Autonomy in Aviation – III

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am

This tutorial is designed to provide an introductory dive into Machine Learning and Deep Learning models.

Operators and analysts are being overwhelmed with the amount of data available in aerospace environments. The magnitude of the data becomes potentially too great to analyze by conventional means. Machine Learning has been proposed as a solution to “big data” problems which will enable analysts to evaluate and determine courses of action based on the information derived from the data. A lot of misinformation surrounds Machine Learning and its potential to enhance operational efficiencies and address current challenges.

This tutorial will delve into Machine Learning and Neural Network models and show how such models can solve potential problems of interest to DASC participants. It presents an overview of current technologies but especially the crucial details on Machine Learning algorithms for aspiring or current users so that they can successfully utilize these techniques in their exploitation of existing data. A key aspect of this course is the discussion of how and when Machine Learning is applicable. An overview of emerging technologies in Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence will be presented. Although many of the examples presented in this course deal with the exploitation of operational data, the techniques can be applied to other data types and domains as well.

Intended audience: Machine learning is gaining traction within the aerospace domain. It is likely that the importance of machine learning will only continue to expand as computers become more efficient and new methods are developed.  Whether the audience wants to apply machine learning within their own applications or gain a better understanding of methods being used by their colleagues, this course will help prepare the audience for an era where machine learning has an ever-growing impact on our field.

PRESENTERS BIO

Rohit Mital is Chief Technologist at KBR. He has over 25 years of experience in developing and delivering high-performance, scalable, complex software systems and solutions in multiple industries, including transportation, insurance, capital markets, telecommunications, and defense. He leads several initiatives in partnership with KBR customers in leveraging digital technologies including Cloud, AI/Machine Learning, Edge Computing and Distributed Ledger. Prior to joining KBR, Rohit spent two decades managing innovation and technology development for early-stage technology companies. He was featured as one of the creative people in small cities across the U.S. by Fast Company in 2004.  Rohit has master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. He has published and presented at conferences on big data, machine learning and distributed ledger in transportation and space domains.

Ramakrishna (Ram) Raju is a subject matter expert supporting FAA and DOT projects at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center in Cambridge, MA for over 15 years. He has over 25 years of experience in the field of designing and developing IT solutions to meet customer needs. He has successfully led the development and deployment of several mission-critical FAA systems. Ram is also the lead of KBRs AI/ML Academy, a company wide initiative to train KBR staff skills in the AI and ML domain.

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am

This tutorial is designed to provide an introductory dive into Machine Learning and Deep Learning models.

Operators and analysts are being overwhelmed with the amount of data available in aerospace environments. The magnitude of the data becomes potentially too great to analyze by conventional means. Machine Learning has been proposed as a solution to “big data” problems which will enable analysts to evaluate and determine courses of action based on the information derived from the data. A lot of misinformation surrounds Machine Learning and its potential to enhance operational efficiencies and address current challenges.

This tutorial will delve into Machine Learning and Neural Network models and show how such models can solve potential problems of interest to DASC participants. It presents an overview of current technologies but especially the crucial details on Machine Learning algorithms for aspiring or current users so that they can successfully utilize these techniques in their exploitation of existing data. A key aspect of this course is the discussion of how and when Machine Learning is applicable. An overview of emerging technologies in Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence will be presented. Although many of the examples presented in this course deal with the exploitation of operational data, the techniques can be applied to other data types and domains as well.

Intended audience: Machine learning is gaining traction within the aerospace domain. It is likely that the importance of machine learning will only continue to expand as computers become more efficient and new methods are developed.  Whether the audience wants to apply machine learning within their own applications or gain a better understanding of methods being used by their colleagues, this course will help prepare the audience for an era where machine learning has an ever-growing impact on our field.

PRESENTERS BIO

Rohit Mital is Chief Technologist at KBR. He has over 25 years of experience in developing and delivering high-performance, scalable, complex software systems and solutions in multiple industries, including transportation, insurance, capital markets, telecommunications, and defense. He leads several initiatives in partnership with KBR customers in leveraging digital technologies including Cloud, AI/Machine Learning, Edge Computing and Distributed Ledger. Prior to joining KBR, Rohit spent two decades managing innovation and technology development for early-stage technology companies. He was featured as one of the creative people in small cities across the U.S. by Fast Company in 2004.  Rohit has master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. He has published and presented at conferences on big data, machine learning and distributed ledger in transportation and space domains.

Ramakrishna (Ram) Raju is a subject matter expert supporting FAA and DOT projects at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center in Cambridge, MA for over 15 years. He has over 25 years of experience in the field of designing and developing IT solutions to meet customer needs. He has successfully led the development and deployment of several mission-critical FAA systems. Ram is also the lead of KBRs AI/ML Academy, a company wide initiative to train KBR staff skills in the AI and ML domain.

FREE TUTORIAL

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
The description of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has continually been evolving over past few decades in correlation with the advancement in technology itself. Very broadly it is branded as computers doing things conventionally performed by humans. In the aviation context this would imply that a couple of decades ago implementation of an autopilot based on aerodynamic equations would qualify as AI.  However, in contemporary times an AI autopilot will mimic the behavior of human pilot. Although AI has existed in some form or another for almost half a century but its ingress into numerous spheres of life has been aided by progress in some of the supporting technologies, namely, high-powered parallel processing, big data analysis and cloud computing, deep learning algorithms.

Aviation safety certification is established upon verifying that all possible in flight occurrences have been perceived and verified. Whereas, in case of AI via machine-learning real-time software evolution cannot be perfectly predicted and verified in advance, this is the real challenge to certification. One solution is to specify machine learning functional boundaries in correlation with real-time monitoring and validation of machine learning solution. Implementation can be sequential with practical ground-based AI for scheduling and routing being the starting point. Next in line will be simpler, non-flight critical functions and finally moving on to flight or safety critical systems. The validation of certification requires that the final product operates in all modes and performs consistently and successfully under all actual operational and environmental conditions founded on conformance to the applicable specifications. In case of adaptive AI systems this can again be a difficult condition to prove.

The tutorial will be presented on behalf of Avionics System Panel which is a technical operations panel of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society (AESS). The panel addresses contemporary issues in avionics systems research, design, test, and certification for civil and military applications. Areas of focus include: communications; command and control; navigation; surveillance; manned/unmanned air traffic management (ATM)The tutorial will be presented in a single session spanning approximately 3 Hours. The tutorial addresses a broad range of audience, spanning from young aspirants interested in enhancing their knowledge of contemporary research areas in avionics engineering to seasoned researchers working on making use of ML / AI certifiable in safety critical avionics systems.

PRESENTERS

  • Roberto Sabatini, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Victoria, Australia
  • Kathleen A Kramer, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
  • Erik Blasch, Air Force Research Lab, USA
  • Giancarmine Fasano, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, ITALY
  • Aloke Roy is the Managing Partner at Visionar Systems, LLC.
  • Irfan Majid, Department of Avionics Engineering, Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan

Monday, Sept. 19, 2022 | 8:00am-11:00am
The description of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has continually been evolving over past few decades in correlation with the advancement in technology itself. Very broadly it is branded as computers doing things conventionally performed by humans. In the aviation context this would imply that a couple of decades ago implementation of an autopilot based on aerodynamic equations would qualify as AI.  However, in contemporary times an AI autopilot will mimic the behavior of human pilot. Although AI has existed in some form or another for almost half a century but its ingress into numerous spheres of life has been aided by progress in some of the supporting technologies, namely, high-powered parallel processing, big data analysis and cloud computing, deep learning algorithms.

Aviation safety certification is established upon verifying that all possible in flight occurrences have been perceived and verified. Whereas, in case of AI via machine-learning real-time software evolution cannot be perfectly predicted and verified in advance, this is the real challenge to certification. One solution is to specify machine learning functional boundaries in correlation with real-time monitoring and validation of machine learning solution. Implementation can be sequential with practical ground-based AI for scheduling and routing being the starting point. Next in line will be simpler, non-flight critical functions and finally moving on to flight or safety critical systems. The validation of certification requires that the final product operates in all modes and performs consistently and successfully under all actual operational and environmental conditions founded on conformance to the applicable specifications. In case of adaptive AI systems this can again be a difficult condition to prove.

The tutorial will be presented on behalf of Avionics System Panel which is a technical operations panel of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society (AESS). The panel addresses contemporary issues in avionics systems research, design, test, and certification for civil and military applications. Areas of focus include: communications; command and control; navigation; surveillance; manned/unmanned air traffic management (ATM)The tutorial will be presented in a single session spanning approximately 3 Hours. The tutorial addresses a broad range of audience, spanning from young aspirants interested in enhancing their knowledge of contemporary research areas in avionics engineering to seasoned researchers working on making use of ML / AI certifiable in safety critical avionics systems.

PRESENTERS

  • Roberto Sabatini, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Victoria, Australia
  • Kathleen A Kramer, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
  • Erik Blasch, Air Force Research Lab, USA
  • Giancarmine Fasano, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, ITALY
  • Aloke Roy is the Managing Partner at Visionar Systems, LLC.
  • Irfan Majid, Department of Avionics Engineering, Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan

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